Chapter 10: Writing Depression and Progress Regression

Oh yes… the subject everyone deals with but nobody likes to talk about.  As I’ve said before, short stories come to my aid when I’m in need of some kind of self-accomplishment.  While that in itself is a beautiful thing (and one that I love doing) it also comes in tow with more rejection.  I have received one rejection every two weeks or less since October.  Still, to say I’ve gone numb to the feeling would be a lie.

I often still find myself falling into the dark pit of depression.  In all fairness, who wouldn’t?  No matter how many times a loved one tells you your work is good, it still doesn’t hold the same value to a stranger saying the same.  I’m not saying my support system is fruitless; in fact, they’re the only reason I haven’t given up.  With that said, someone at least putting me on the waiting list would be a nice pat on the back.  It’s so hard right now to find the motivation to write anything, because what good is a book if it’s not being read?

On happier news, I just finished my YA Fantasy novel, The Freedom Game, and am beginning to send out my query letters to agents.  I know there will be countless bullets to my heart before I hear a happy response, and that’s assuming I hear one at all.  …If you’re an agent into YA Fantasy, feel free to email me 😉

I started this book on January 1, 2017, so you can indeed say I’ve spent a lot of time on its betterment.  I have to admit, though, part of the reason is because, well, I just wouldn’t write.  It’s hard to find the motivation when you’re not reaping any rewards.  It seems like it’s you against the world, and the inner desire to write is beaten down by all the little things.

Still, my book’s become so near and dear to my heart that I’ve decided no matter how many battles lie ahead, I will publish it.  Self-publishing is a beautiful thing, and with my degree in finance I think I could do it decently well.  After all ‘self’ means the only approval I need is my own, and thus no one is poking a stick at my head telling me ‘You’re not good enough.’

Now, I’m no fool.  I know I’m not the only writer who goes through this kind of pain.  So, below I put a list of what I personally do to try to claw my way out of the pit.

  1. Drink tea. Simple, I know; but, also powerful.  The reason I’m putting this first is because I think you should do it while trying out my other ideas.  Drinking tea while sitting there crying won’t have the same effects as drinking tea while reading a book for instance.  But seriously, have you ever tried Yogi Stress Reliever Tea?  If not, you should!  It’s not an instant cure as much as a slow-proving one.  It also has the habit of making me sleepy, proving that it does indeed calm my nerves.
  2. Watch a movie that’s so bad it’s funny. This is a weird one, I know, but it has multiple benefits.  It doesn’t require any brain power, and so you can spend your time laughing your butt off and just letting loose.  It’s amazing how a bad film can actually take you away from the miseries of reality.  Also, it doesn’t hurt to know that there’s art out there that’s much, much worse than your own (Sad to say, but true).  One Netflix show that I would suggest for this exact purpose is ‘Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Return.’  It’s hilariously stupid and gets me laughing.
  3. Go on a walk/hike. Personally, I live in Florida.  Aka flat and humid.  That doesn’t stop me from walking in the mornings, though.  I love to find random nooks where a trail is hidden in the middle of city, etc.  If you’re in basically any other state, there’s probably easy walks with glorious sights.  There’s something to be said about leaving your apartment, even if it is to something as simple as walk.  Different location translates to different emotions.
  4. Go to the gym. No, don’t run away.  Even if you are, I got you running ;).  It’s science; working out releases endorphins.  Endorphins make you happy.    I’m not saying you have to go every day; far from it.  The gym is a place of noise.  Weights falling.  People talking.  Music playing.  It jars at your mind in just the right way.  It’s hard to get lost in thought when so much is going on around you, which in this case is good.  Why?  If you were just rejected, you want your thoughts anywhere but on that fact.  If you’re like me, you’ll also enjoy people watching as an added bonus.
  5. Write a letter to a friend. I know, how old fashioned!  Still though, when you’re writing someone a letter, you automatically feel required to write more than just a quick hello.  You should take the opportunity to catch them up on your life.  And, guess what?  Now, you’re forced to think about everything else going on in your life.  Your puppy is now a dog.  You’re up for a promotion at work.  Your family is about to visit.  You live in a nice area.  You just met someone as wacky as you are.  Hell, even tell them what you made for dinner the night before.  It doesn’t matter!

2 Replies to “Chapter 10: Writing Depression and Progress Regression”

  1. You are 100% right about the tea 😉 Always helps me, if it doesn’t put me to sleep first. I need tea with a lot of caffeine if I’m going to try to be productive.

    The other suggestions are good too!

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