The Witch’s March: Sneak Peak

Prologue: Afternoon Visitors

23 August 1914

            The only sounds in Mons were of bullet-fire and death.  Hattie had done what she was supposed to and continued healing injured soldiers at her post, even when hearing the Germans had first started their offensive at dawn.  Since the very first bomb went off that morning, there was one worry echoing around in her skull: Joey was out there, and he could die while she sat in the background.  Now finally in the city with him, Hattie was more determined than ever to do her part at the front-line and save her brother.  As she reached the back line, she stole away soldiers’ confusion at seeing a woman walking towards the danger before deciding they didn’t have the time to deal with her.  They were forcing young children out of women’s arms that refused to leave the city.  She walked with relaxed shoulders and purposeful strides, trying to keep her face down away from possibly prying eyes.

The blood of the dead flowed through her, fueling her magic despite the grief it struck.  She let it settle into her as a familiar warmth as her eyes scanned through face after face for Joey. Surviving commanders shouted orders of retreat from the closest salient.  They definitely wouldn’t direct her further into their battle.  She ignored them and walked on.

“You there – nurse.”  Of course, people were bound to question a five-ten woman in the middle of a war zone eventually.  She turned to a white-mustached British officer with a large nose and tired eyes.  “How did you get this far into the city?  You need to evacuate now.”

“I’m not in the military, nor am I one of the queen’s subjects, so I’m afraid you don’t get to tell me to leave,” Hattie said.  She shifted her pocket knife out of her sleeve and reached it underneath her low bun to the never fully healed scar there, slicing into the thick skin.  The magic bled out of her like a boiling kettle, furnished by the climbing number of hundreds of corpses around her.  It was nearly overkill to do a simple distraction skill.

The officer walked towards his men to continue shouting orders, and she continued forward on her search.  She knew he was there; she could feel him. With her spell, he would walk right past her if she didn’t stop him.

Now at the front line, with only stacks of sandbags protecting them from the Germans, she found it harder to hide her desperation.  Where was her brother?

The gunfire was ringing, forcing her to put her hands over her ears as she looked around.  The power flowing from the blood in her small cut was dizzying.  When she spun around to turn down another street, she nearly sobbed when she saw him.  He was leaning against one of the shorter stacks of bags, gun in hand as he peaked around the line.

“Joey!” she shouted, hurrying towards him.  His chocolate brown hair was buzzed short to his scalp, his mustache surrounded by growing scruff.  Bags drooped deep under his red-rimmed eyes, and his uniform wasn’t as crisp as he normally kept it.  At her touch, her spell’s power over him broke, and he jumped at seeing her so close, barrel aimed in between her eyes.  She didn’t blink.  “Joey, we have to hold them off.”

“Hat– what the f– what are you doing here?” he asked, his grip immediately tight around her bicep.  “You have to get out of here!”

“Don’t be an idiot, Joey.  Guns clearly aren’t enough to hold off the Germans.  Together, we can do it.”

“You’re the one being an idiot.  Get the hell out of here!” he said, pushing her back away from the sandbags.  “It’s not safe–”

Hattie didn’t distinguish the shot from the constant barrage of bullets, but it struck through her brother’s back all the same.  His eyes widened, and he didn’t look away as he swayed.  An animalistic scream erupted from her throat as she hurried to catch him.  No, she just found him – they were supposed to be safe together.

He looked down at where the bullet had come out through his chest, the blood seeping through his uniform as the men around her suddenly noticed the pair.  She pressed her hand into the wound, the red warm against her palm as she began to whisper her healing spell.

Men started shouting and trying to pull her off of him.  She wouldn’t let them. She couldn’t.  Her spell wasn’t finished.

Joey coughed in a way that shattered her heart as a soldier pulled them both further behind cover.  He looked up at her as the men surrounded him, his mouth twitching into a smile before he completely collapsed.

His smile stayed frozen in place as the men lowered to the ground.  Their attention only on him for another brief moment before one of them pronounced him dead.

Hattie fell to her knees as the world was torn from beneath her.  Other soldiers grabbed her by the arms and began to drag her away, but he shook them off with a scream.  She tried to crawl towards him, but they wouldn’t let her.  Everything spun around her, except him.  As she looked at his body laying there perfectly still, she knew she was too late.

The chaos around her echoed back into words – men shouting orders of retreat.  Two men held either of her arms as they finally pulled her back, her eyes locked helplessly on her brother’s corpse.  Hattie growled before elbowing one of her captors in the gut, making him drop her.  Using all her weight, she swung to punch the other right in the nose.  It crunched beneath her fist, his blood pouring out to add fuel to her already raging fire.  She pried his hand from her arm before spinning around and scurrying back to her brother.

His blood was her blood, and it spiraled through her like a shot of heroin.  She nearly glowed with magic trying to burst through her skin, and it mixed with her anger until her entire body boiled with rage.

She ripped open his shirt, smearing his blood onto her fingers before tracing it on her forehead in a triangle.  Heaven. Hell. Earth.

Her kin’s blood rippled through her like a tidal wave.  Hattie ignored the shouting from the frightened men and walked out from behind the safety of their walls.

Before any Germans could realize what was happening, she released her power like a machine gun.  It shot across the streets in a stinging breeze, followed by silence as the temperature plummeted to freezing.

A single shot fired, and Hattie grunted as a bullet struck her in the shoulder.  She cried out and stumbled but refused to fall, her blood singing her skin red as it soaked into her shirt.

Her hand cradled the wound as she stayed firmly rooted in place, her spell a whisper in the Germans’ ears.  Her voice came from everywhere, ringing around them like a hissing snake – but the spell wasn’t meant for them.

A mist crept from the shadows, and in its haze stood the ghosts of men.  Listening to the call to follow the witch’s march.

Instead of guns, these ghosts held bows.  Their pointed helmets faded in and out, the red crosses on their tunics sliding away like melting paint.  Hattie didn’t care to know which century they were from, and she didn’t care.  Her only concern was if they were as bloodthirsty as the day they died.

Her chanting grew louder, bouncing around the city’s walls as she beckoned the undead forward.  She cried out to them, and they responded by raising their bows.

Arrows shot through the streets like bullets, Hattie taking a fresh breath as she heard the thuds of German bodies falling to the ground.  She had never killed a man before, but she had no regret or hesitation.  One of those men killed her brother, and since she couldn’t be sure which one, she’d have to play it safe and kill them all.

Hattie opened her mouth to shout the order, but it was as if the ghost soldiers could hear her thoughts.  They attacked her brother’s killers mercilessly, gliding through the streets as hundreds of arrows clouded the skies.  More and more of her enemies fell, and she bathed in the power of their blood.

“Look, it’s angels!  God is on our side!” she heard a Brit shout.  No, it wasn’t Him this time, but she didn’t mind giving Him the credit.

A bullet tore into her stomach, and she let out an unexpected yelp of pain.  Hattie pressed into the wound as the blood soaked her uniform in warm, crimson stains, both giving and taking her strength all at once.  She looked around as her soldiers persisted, arrow after arrow flying towards the enemy line, but the Germans were still advancing.  It looked as though even angels couldn’t stop the Devil when they were already in Hell.

Another bullet buried into her leg, and she fell to the ground.  Her archers continued their assault but crowded in front of her, forming a visible barrier for her even if the bullets would just fly through them.  She had done her part, at least for now.  Hattie crawled back towards the British line as her archers continued their assault.

It was clear that Hattie couldn’t win this battle, but she’d be damned if she lost the Great War.  A fellow Ally ran towards her, shouting nonsensical insults as he put her arm around him for support.  Her mind screamed that she wasn’t done yet – there was still more revenge to be reaped – but her body had completely given up.  Her legs sagged, and her Ally held most of her weight as he dragged her into retreat.  She looked back one last time at her brother as the soldier pulled her away towards safety.

No, she wasn’t done yet.  Haste me to know ‘t, that I, with wings as swift as meditation or the thoughts of love, may sweep to my revenge.

~*~

            The battle had taken nearly the entire day, but as the sun began its descent in the sky, at long last the Germans could finally claim victory.  They were to move west soon, but no soldier would miss the opportunity to scavenge the dead for supplies.  Fresh boots, ammunition, and sometimes even hidden snacks were too valuable.

Victory or no, the men were all still unnerved from what had happened.  They argued over what they had seen.  Some imagined they were angels, while others said they must’ve been demons.  A few lunatics even claimed some witch bitch had resurrected them from the dead.

Generaloberst König, this one’s alive!” a German cadet shouted.

The colonel general turned to the voice, and the cadet’s face paled, for half of his commander’s face was burned so deeply he could see the actual muscles tick within his jaw.  The story was that König’s latest encounter with an Element Focuser had left him with half of his face and one less eye, but hearing about it and seeing it were two entirely different matters.

Colonel General König walked over to his shouting subordinate and looked down at the muttering soldier.  It looked as though the shot had just missed his heart; less than an inch to the left, and they would be dealing with another corpse instead of a potential prisoner.

An American, and by his smell, also a wizard.  The colonel general smiled.  How long had he waited for this chance?  “Get this man a doctor.  I need him alive.

The Witch’s March: History Fact #5

On October 8, 1941, Stalin gave orders to deploy three all-female air force units.  They followed twelve commandments, the first being “be proud you are a woman.”  However, the women were given the oldest and noisiest airplanes.  Their engines would conk out halfway through their missions so that the women would have to climb out on the wings midflight to restart the propellers.  The planes were so noisy that to stop the Germans from hearing them, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to German positions, drop their bombs, and then quickly flee.  The women would fly in groups of three airplanes at night, with two of them acting as ‘spotlights’ and distracting the German planes while the third cut off their engines and then quickly coast down to drop their bombs.  The only noise this action was make was a “whoosh” that the Germans compared to the sound of a witch’s broomstick.  This, combined with their nocturnal attack times, led the Germans to give them the name “Night Witches”.  Additionally, once they learned that the successful Russian air teams were made entirely of women they reasoned two possibilities: (a) the women were a group of criminals and thieves forced to fight on the front as punishment, and were used to killing or (b) they had been injected with some secret serum that gave them the ability to see in the dark.

In addition to the terrible engines, their airplanes also had limited weight capacity and their funding was given very low priority.  This meant that they lacked “luxury items” that their mile counterparts used, including: parachutes, radar, guns and radios.  They were instead given rulers, stopwatches, flashlights, pencils, maps and compasses.   This didn’t stop their success on the front, though, as their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

In The Witch’s March, what kind of urban fantasy war female author would I be if I didn’t include such a powerful group of Allied women that did so much for their country and the war who are SO aptly named?!  In my series, Rada Medved is a Night Witch who also happens to be an actual witch.

Re-Publishing Your Novel by Kristen Brand

Personally, as an Indie author, I’ve always been curious about the process of re-publishing a novel.  I enjoy the creative freedom of self-publishing way too much to ever go for traditional publishing the first round, but what if a publishing company finds my finished work and wants to add it to their shelves?  Well, that very thing happened to Kristen Brand, author of The White Knight & Black Valentine Series.  She was able to re-sell her Steampunk novels, The Ghost Machine and Clockmaker, to Silver Empire publishing, and since she’s my sister, I took advantage and decided her to ask some questions that I’m sure we’re all wondering.

  1. Was your process overall positive or negative?

It’s still in the early days, but everything’s very positive so far! To give a little background, my first experience with this publisher was when I submitted my short story, The Strange Stairs at the Aldebourne Estate, to their Secret Stairs anthology.

The anthology is a collection of stories about the urban legend of mysterious staircases leading to nowhere found in the middle of the woods. I thought the idea was fascinating, and it inspired me to write a short story starring Ella Rosenfeld, the spirit medium protagonist of my steampunk novel, The Ghost Machine. The story was accepted, and Secret Stairs went on to be a smash success and bestseller in the horror genre.

Later, the publisher reached out to me about republishing some or all of my self-published novels. I wasn’t ready to part with all my novels, since I didn’t want all my eggs in one basket, so to speak, and I do like the independence of being a self-published author. But it seemed like a perfect fit for my two steampunk novels, since the publisher had already published a short story from that world and has a catalog of other steampunk books.

2. Did you make any revisions to the text before re-publishing?

Nope! There were no changes to the actual content of the book, only the packaging.

3. Talk about your new cover.

I think it does a great job getting across that this is a steampunk novel with an eerie atmosphere. The dark, decrepit hallway is perfectly creepy and straight out of Auttenberg Asylum from the story. Plus, I love the gear design behind the title.

While part of me wants the girl on the cover to exactly match every single minute detail of how I described the character and her wardrobe on the pages, the purpose of a book cover is to sell books, and this cover is doing just that—and doing it stylishly!

4. How involved were you in any changes made?

Since the changes were all on the book formatting and publishing side rather than editorial, I wasn’t involved much. Which frees me up to write more, so no complaints here.

5. How did the marketing and promotion differ from the first go-around?

It was much better planned, ha! Like a lot of authors, I kind of stumble around in the dark when it comes to marketing. I spent a lot of time contacting book bloggers after I first published The Ghost Machine, only to have a small fraction respond.

My publisher ran a successful Kickstarter to fund the book’s relaunch, getting publicity before it was even out. They grew my followers on Bookbub and put out advanced review copies on Booksrpout. I’ve definitely learned a lot from watching their process.

When I first published the book on my own, I didn’t really try to market it until after it was released. Now, I realize how important it is to plan ahead and put things in motion months in advance. I’m definitely going to put these lessons into practice for my future releases.

 

Chapter 35: How to Price Your Book & When to Set It to Free

You might not think of pricing as part of your marketing, but it definitely is.  One of the bonuses to self-publishing is that you have complete control over your price and can change it whenever you want based on how the sales are going.  Before we get into where your book price should lie, I’m going to go into Amazon’s different royalty plans via KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing).

KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing) has different royalty plans based on the format.  For paperback, you’ll automatically be set to 60% with a minimum price of $9.06, but please realize that 60% doesn’t include what they’re taking out for printing.  You can also do expanded distribution where your books becomes available to more readers through bookstores, online retailers, libraries, and academic institutions (for a hit of bringing your royalty down to 40%).  Although this is AMAZING and can definitely help expand your audience, just keep in mind that it just puts your book on a list, and Amazon doesn’t guarantee any extra sales.  It also increases your minimum price to $13.59.

­For eBooks, KDP lets you pick between two different royalty plans.  35% and 70%.  Of course, I would suggest using the 70% in most instances (duh, higher percentage means higher paycheck) but you can only select this option if your eBook is between $2.99 and $9.99.  If you’re writing a long series, I would highly recommend bringing the book down to 99 cents and doing the 35% royalty.  I’ll get more into ‘why’ later… I would also suggest looking at the global market places and bringing the to X.99 across the board.­

One of the bonuses to being self-published is that you have a lot less overhead compared to traditional publishing, as well as the fact you get a higher royalty per sale.  This means that we have the opportunity to change our prices a lot more depending on what we’re seeing on our sales report.

Non-fiction books tend to sell for higher than fiction.  Why?  Because the readers are generally looking for a book to answer one specific question for them, where for fictions the readers tend to shop continuously until they find something they like.  I would suggest checking the top 100 in your category and see with what price you can get away with.  Don’t sell your debut indie novel for $12 when even top sellers in your genre are selling for $8.

I would say the most common price for indie authors just starting out is $2.99 for eBooks and $9.99 for paperbacks.  As you build a loyal audience and start to have more steady purchases, start to up your price.  It’s all about supply and demand.  Once your readers know that they like your books, they’ll be willing to spend more because its quality is guaranteed.

If you can get your book cover artist to make a paperback cover, make your book paperback.  Amazon will produce the books for you.  I’ve done it for my books, and although they’re not the BEST quality, they’re still really good and seem sturdy.  Even if you see you’re not making the paperback sales, I would keep it up there.  Amazon tells its customers the prices of both, and seeing the eBook price compared to the higher paperback price will make your potential readers feel like they’re getting a better deal.

Take advantage of your independency with the price and price pulse.  Price pulsing is doing limited-time price changes for a specific sales period.  You lower your prices for a short time and promote the sale.  Blast it any venue you can find that you’re having a sale.  For Kobo and iBooks, you can schedule price changes in advantage, but you have to go in manually for Amazon.  Be sure to do this a few days earlier than your announced sales date, because it can sometimes take a few days to reflect the change.  Also, don’t forget for Amazon to go back in there to change it back to its normal price once the sale is over.

If you have multiple books out, use the opportunity to set your books to multiple price points.  It’s a great way to spread out your risk and see what works best.  I would definitely suggest the lower price points being at the beginning of your series and upping the price once you know you have the readers hooked.

A question I know a lot of authors ask is “how can a free book make me money?”  Or they think that by setting it to free, they’re undervaluing all of their hard work.  But think of a taste tester at a Publix (or other grocery store… sorry I’m from Florida!).  You try the delicious cheese or dessert for free, and next thing you know you’re buying the whole pack.  As a reader, why would you spend money on a book or series when you have no idea what to expect?  Especially when they can get another book from a big name author that they know they can trust for quality.  That’s why free works best with the first book in a series.  Get them invested in your characters for free, and then they’ll be handing you their money all series long.  In fact, some reports have shown that 60% of readers who buy a free book will go on to buy another book from the same author.

If you’ve recently finished a novel or are about to, and have questions where you should set that price point, comment below and I’ll do my best to help!

The Witch’s March: History Fact #4

The Austro-Hungarian Empire was a constitutional monarchy in Central and Eastern Europe between 1867 and 1918.

When thinking of World War I, Budapest isn’t a city that often comes to mind, even though it served as capital to its empire.  With energy that rivaled Vienna and café society that rivaled Paris, Budapest entered the 20th century on the rise.  And although it never saw enemy faces inside its walls, the city was destroyed by the Great War all the same.  Although I take liberties to bring a group of Allies into the city, it wouldn’t be fair for me to not divulge into how terrible war can be even when it’s not right at your doorstep…

World War I helped lead to the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and not only that but half of the Hungarian population was cut away by the Treaty of Trianon and made part of surrounding nations.  From 1918 to 1919, Budapest was shaken by two revolutions: The Aster Revolution followed by two years of White Terror.

The Aster Revolution received its name because the revolting citizens placed aster flowers in their hats and caps to symbolize support for the Hungarian National Council and Count Károlyi.  They even took it upon themselves to demobilize soldiers in the city.  They murdered the former Prime Minister István Tisza and forced Prime Minister Sándor Wekerle to resign.  By the end of the day, King Charles IV was forced to accept them and Károlyi became the new Prime Minister.  One of his first acts?  Dissolving the Austro-Hungarian union.

The victorious Entente powers then took steps to carve out any ethnicity that wasn’t white, including Czechoslovakia and Romania.  The overall efforts resulted in Hungary losing two thirds of its land area and one third of its Hungarian-speaking nationals.  You don’t have to be an expert in socioeconomics to understand that this drastic change was bound to pull out problem after problems…

The nation’s attempts to form a single stable government failed, and by March of 1919 communists had taken over.